Month: Aug 2016

Aside from being the longest psalm, Psalm 119 is also the longest and most carefully structured chapter in the Bible. The psalm is an acrostic poem of 22 stanzas, following the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. Within each stanza, each verse begins with the same Hebrew letter.
The cornerstone (118:22) is the large shaped stone at the corner of the building’s foundation. It is essential to a structure’s stability. Several NT writers compared Jesus Christ to a cornerstone (e.g., Matt. 21:42; Eph. 2:20; 1 Pet. 2:4–8).
Unequal weights. The price for some goods was fixed according to their weight. If the seller’s scales were unequal (20:23), the buyer could be charged far more than the fair price of the goods.
A psalm of thanksgiving. The words of Psalm 116 are excellent for expressing public thanks after surviving a crisis situation.
Idols (115:4) represent anything allowed to compete with God for ultimate loyalty, robbing him of the devotion and glory he alone deserves. Idolatry is evil and foolish. God deserves our wholehearted love because nothing else compares with him.
Flint is a very hard variety of quartz that was plentiful in the land of the Bible. It could be broken into sharp pieces and used to make tools and weapons. Knives, arrowheads, sickle blades, and saws were all made from flint. The Bible often uses flint as a picture of strength and determination (Isa. 50:7; Ezek. 3:9). In Psalm 114, it provides a picture of God’s power over what he has created.
Two acrostic poems. Because of their similar themes, Psalms 111 and 112 can be seen as companion psalms. Both are also acrostic poems. In the acrostics of the OT, each line or verse begins with successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet.